Cystoscopy

Cystoscopy

Cystoscopy Definition

Cystoscopy (cystourethroscopy) is a diagnostic procedure that is used to look at the bladder (lower urinary tract), collect urine samples, and examine the prostate gland. Performed with an optic instrument known as a cystoscope (urethroscope), this instrument uses a lighted tip for guidance to aid in diagnosing urinary tract disease and prostate disease. Performed by a urologist, this surgical test also enables biopsies to be taken or small stones to be removed by way of a hollow channel in the cystoscope.

Purpose

Categorized as an endoscopic procedure, cystoscopy is used by urologists to examine the entire bladder lining and take biopsies of any areas that look questionable. This test is not used on a routine basis, but may benefit the urologist who is needing further information about a patient who displays the following symptoms or diagnosis:
blood in the urine (also known as hematuria)
incontinence or the inabililty to control urination
a urinary tract infection
a urinary tract which display signs of congenital abnormalities
tumors located in the bladder
the presence of bladder or kidney stones
a stiffness or strained feeling of the urethra or ureters
symptoms of an enlarged prostate
Blood and urine studies, in addition to x rays of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may all occur before a cystoscopy. At the time of surgery, a retrograde pyelogram may also be performed. Additional blood studies may be needed immediately following surgery.

Purpose

Categorized as an endoscopic procedure, cystoscopy is used by urologists to examine the entire bladder lining and take biopsies of any areas that look questionable. This test is not used on a routine basis, but may benefit the urologist who is needing further information about a patient who displays the following symptoms or diagnosis:
blood in the urine (also known as hematuria)
incontinence or the inabililty to control urination
a urinary tract infection
a urinary tract which display signs of congenital abnormalities
tumors located in the bladder
the presence of bladder or kidney stones
a stiffness or strained feeling of the urethra or ureters
symptoms of an enlarged prostate
Blood and urine studies, in addition to x rays of the kidneys, ureters and bladder may all occur before a cystoscopy. At the time of surgery, a retrograde pyelogram may also be performed. Additional blood studies may be needed immediately following surgery.

Precautions

While the cystoscopy procedure is commonly relied upon to gather additional diagnostic information, it is an invasive surgical technique that may involve risks for certain patients. Those who are extremely overweight (obese), smoke, are recovering from a recent illness, or are treating a chronic condition may face additional risks from surgery.
Surgical risk also increases in patients who are currently using certain drugs including antihypertensives; muscle relaxants; tranquilizers; sleep inducers; insulin; sedatives; beta blockers; or cortisone. Those who use mind-altering drugs also put themselves at increased risk of complications during surgery. The following mind-altering drugs should be avoided: narcotics; psychedelics; hallucinogens; marijuana; sedatives; hypnotics; or cocaine.

Preparation

As procedure that can be completed in a hospital, doctor’s office, or outpatient surgical facility, an injection of spinal or general anesthesia may be used prior to a cystoscopy. While this test is typically performed on an outpatient basis, a patient may require up to three days of recovery in the hospital.